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Patient Education

Diabetic Nephropathy

Diabetes can lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and kidney failure. This is called "diabetic nephropathy". Even when diabetes is controlled, the disease can lead to kidney damage. People with diabetes should be screened regularly for kidney disease by testing for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin. Your nephrologist may recommend consuming less protein and use of a blood pressure medication to protect the kidneys. More...

Hemodialysis

The kidneys clear the blood of excess fluid, salts, minerals, and other wastes (urea). If somebody's kidneys are not functioning normally, hemodialysis may be used to perform the same task. It filters the blood to keep the proper balance of water, electrolytes and manage blood pressure. Hemodialysis is usually performed 3 times a week, with each treatment lasting about 3-5 hours. More...

High Blood Pressure Treatment

High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but can lead serious medical problems, including heart failure, kidney failure, and stroke. If you have high blood pressure (hypertension), your nephrologist may recommend a treatment plan to bring your blood pressure under control. Treatment options include lifestyle changes (dietary changes, weight loss, smoking cessation) and blood pressure medications. More...

Kidney Transplantation

A kidney transplant involves replacing an unhealthy kidney with a healthy kidney from a donor. This is performed on people with kidney failure who must otherwise undergo a lifetime of dialysis to keep blood clean. A transplant team is involved in determine who is a good candidate for a transplant and finding a proper match. There aren't enough kidney donors for every person who needs a transplant, so people needing a transplant are put on a waiting list. More...