Patient Education

Alzheimer's Disease Medications

Although there is no cure for Alzheimer's Disease, there are medications that can slow the progress of the disease. There are also medications to help control associated symptoms. If the person you are caring for has Alzheimer's Disease, speak to a neurologist to learn if there might be benefits to treatment. More...

Botulinum Toxin for Spasticity

Botulinum toxin injections (Botox, Dysport, Myobloc) are a treatment option for spasticity. The toxin stop muscle spasms by blocking chemical messages sent from the nerves to the muscles. It may be used to treat muscle spasms associated with focal dystonias (cervical dystonia, blepharospasm) or spasticity that may result from cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury, or multiple sclerosis. More...

Multiple Sclerosis Treatments to Reduce Disease Activity

Disease-modifying therapy describes medications for people with multiple sclerosis that have been shown to reduce the number and/or severity of MS attacks (flares). People who begin treatment with a disease-modifying therapy after their first attack have fewer brain lesions and fewer relapses over time. Your neurologist will recommend an MS medication based on several factors, including your type of multiple sclerosis, the severity and type of symptoms, your response to past treatments, and your personal preferences. More...

Electromyogram (EMG)

Electromyography (EMG) is a test that performed to diagnose neuromuscular disorders that may be causing tingling, numbness or muscle weakness. EMG may diagnose pinched nerves caused by a herniated disk, carpal tunnel syndrome, ALS, or other medical conditions. More...

Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a brain disorder that results in repeated seizures. About 1/2 of all seizures have no known cause. There are many other types of epilepsy, each with its own characteristic set of symptoms that vary from person to person. Symptoms may include strange emotions and behavior, muscle spasms, convulsions and loss of consciousness. Epilepsy may be diagnosed with an electroencephalogram (EEG). More...

Headache Medications

If you suffer from frequent or severe headaches, speak to a neurologist about treatment options. There a a variety of headache treatments available to alleviate the pain and to prevent additional headaches. Medications include analgesics (aspirin), ergotamines, triptans, and botulinum toxin. Your neurologist will recommend one or more medications depending on several factors, including your type of headache, its frequency and severity, your response to past treatments, and personal preferences. More...

Medications for Parkinson's Disease

There are several medications that can reduce the symptoms of Parkinson's Disease, such as tremor and rigidity. The most commonly prescribed PD medication, such as levodopa, increase the levels of dopamine in the brain. Your neurologist will prescribe one or more medications based on the severity of your symptoms, your response to past treatments, and other factors. More...

What is a Neurologist?

A neurologist is a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis, treatment and management of illnesses of the brain, spine and nervous system, including ALS, Alzheimer's Disease, chronic pain, epilepsy, headache, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, tremor and stroke. A neurologist must graduate from medical school and complete additional neurology residency training. Many neurologists complete additional Fellowship training in a subspecialty, such as epilepsy or movement disorders. Neurologists may belong to the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and be designated as "Fellows" with the "FAAN" suffix following their name. More...