Dr. Todd Minars, MD


Physician (MD, DO)
Dermatology

Specialty

Cosmetic Dermatology

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Minars Dermatology
4060 Sheridan St
Suite C
Hollywood, Florida 33021 [MAP]
For an appointment, call (954) 324-2425
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About Me

Dr. Todd Minars, MD is a board-certified dermatologist providing care to patients in the Hollywood, Miami Florida area at Minars Dermatology.

Dr. Minars also serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Dermatology at the University of Miami School of Medicine.

Dr. Minars is affiliated with Memorial Regional Hospital, Hollywood Medical Center, Jackson Memorial Hospital, and Kindred Hospital
 

Medical Expertise

Dr. Minars specializes in medical and cosmetic dermatology with expertise in the treatment of acne, atopic dermatitis,  eczema, psoriasis, rosacea, and skin cancer.

Conditions Treated

Acne
Aging Skin & Wrinkles
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
Atopic Dermatitis
Hair Loss (Balding)
Psoriasis
Rosacea
Seborrheic Keratosis
Skin Cancer
Warts

Procedures & Services

Botox® Cosmetic
Dysport®
Juvederm®
Laser Hair Removal
Tissue Tightening
Tattoo Removal

Tips & Wisdom

Rosacea Skin Care Advice

These rosacea skin care tips from dermatologist Dr. Todd Minars called “Face Savers” are aimed at controlling rosacea outbreaks and reducing their severity.

They include the following:

- Clean your face gently no more than twice a day with Cetaphil cleanser or the medicated cleanser.

Avoid hot showers, baths or saunas.

- Stay cool on hot or humid days (air conditioning and sip ice water).

- Avoid the sun.

- Switch from blades to an electric razor.

- Find substitutes for hot spices such as pepper, cayenne and paprika. Instead of chili powder, try a 2-to-1 blend of cumin and oregano.

- Try taking an antihistamine (e.g. Benadryl or Claritin) two hours before eating cheese, vinegar, processed beef or pork, or canned fish. It may also help to take an aspirin before meals high in niacin (meat, eggs, dairy).

- Minimize stress with proper sleep, deep breathing exercises, visualization, stretching, or yoga.

- Use transparent makeup with a green tint to help hide redness.

- Ask (your doctor’s) aesthetician about skin care products that will not aggravate your condition.

Dysport for Wrinkles

I consider [Dysport] to be pretty much equivalent to Botox. I tell patients it is “Coke vs. Pepsi”, or two different brands of basically the same thing. There are a few differences worth mentioning.

Dysport also has a reputation of diffusing a little bit further beyond the area of injection than Botox. I think that this is a true, though minimal, difference. This can be an advantage or a disadvantage and the injector must take it into account when treating patients. This extra diffusion seems to be an advantage when treating hyperhidrosis patients (those with excessive sweating). These patients have less breakthrough sweating with Dysport than with Botox.

The most important question is which lasts longer? And as far as I can tell, they both last the same amount of time.

Botox® For Wrinkle Treatment

The cosmetic use of Botox® has literally revolutionized the treatment of wrinkles.  The results are dramatic, but natural (if done correctly) and the procedure is safe.  Here are a few tips to achieve the best results:

    1. Choose the right doctor.  How?  Ask friends for a recommendation. Use a dermatologist who you have already seen for a skin problem (but make sure that you trust and like this person), or check these resources on the web: Allergan’s website www.botoxcosmetic.com and www.aboutskinsurgery.com. One caveat: If you have your Botox® done by somebody who is not a physician, you are asking for trouble.
    2. Do not fall for “low price” advertising.  These ads in the back of magazines that seem too good to be true, are too good to be true.  Botox® is expensive to buy, and they will simply use less of it.
    3. Once you’ve been treated, keep your follow-up appointment.  This is an opportunity for the doctor to do “touch-ups” that can make all the difference in your final result.
    4. Maintain your Botox®.  This usually requires three treatments a year. Botox® gives an immediate improvement (first week), but after a few months, the effect increases.  This is for two reasons:  First, the muscles that form wrinkles, smooth out with time and the skin “re-drapes”.  Second, the skin, now free from the muscle that was “ironing” in the line, has time to repair itself.
    5. Deep lines need combination treatment.  Botox® cannot cure every wrinkle, but results can be enhanced by combining Botox® with a second minor procedure. For instance, a great way to treat “Crow’s Feet” is to combine Botox® with a very light laser peel.
    6. Make Botox® part of an overall plan for your skin.  Wear sunscreen, start a home skin care regimen, and combine Botox® with other appropriate procedures that improve the overall appearance and structure of your skin.
Second Thoughts About Your Tattoo?

If so you are not alone. What once seemed like a good idea just doesn’t fit your image now and you wish it could just go away. Well, the good news is that for most tattoos, it is possible to achieve this by using a laser.  The bad news is that it is a lot easier to put a tattoo on than to take it off.  One challenge is that different tattoo artists use different inks and place them at different depths.

Tattoo ink stays in the skin permanently because the particles of ink are too large for the body to absorb.  The laser works by “exploding” these large ink particles into smaller “bite-size” particles that the body’s cells can gobble up and remove. It takes about eight weeks for these cells to do their job, therefore you should wait about eight weeks between each laser treatment for maximum clearing.

How many treatments will you need to clear the tattoo?

That depends on a few factors – but most importantly the color of the ink and the depth.

The easiest tattoos to remove are those that are “homemade”.  These are usually black and the ink is not very deep and they can completely disappear with 1 to 3 treatments.  The most difficult tattoos to remove are professional tattoos with multiple colors.  This will require several treatments – in some cases 7 to 10 treatments over the course of a year.  And certain colors will never completely disappear – green and yellow are especially difficult.  The most common tattoos are “in-between” the extreme cases that we just mentioned.  These are tattoos that were done by a professional, but have only one or two colors.  In the past, all methods to remove tattoos left scars, including the earliest lasers.  Today, the technology has advanced, and a tattoo can be removed with a laser and not leave a scar.  So most tattoos can be removed by a laser, it just takes little technology and quite a bit of time.

Rosacea Skin Care Tips

These rosacea skin care tips from dermatologist Dr. Todd Minars called “Face Savers” are aimed at controlling rosacea outbreaks and reducing their severity.

They include the following:

  1. Clean your face gently no more than twice a day with Cetaphil cleanser or the medicated cleanser.
  2. Avoid hot showers, baths or saunas.
  3. Stay cool on hot or humid days (air conditioning and sip ice water).
  4. Avoid the sun.
  5. Switch from blades to an electric razor.
  6. Find substitutes for hot spices such as pepper, cayenne and paprika. Instead of chili powder, try a 2-to-1 blend of cumin and oregano.
  7. Try taking an antihistamine (e.g. Benadryl or Claritin) two hours before eating cheese, vinegar, processed beef or pork, or canned fish. It may also help to take an aspirin before meals high in niacin (meat, eggs, dairy)
  8. Minimize stress with proper sleep, deep breathing exercises, visualization, stretching, or yoga.
  9. Use transparent makeup with a green tint to help hide redness.
  10. Ask  (your doctor’s) aesthetician about skin care products that will not aggravate your condition.
Fungal Nail Infections Explained

Toe nail fungus (also known as onychomycosis) is difficult to treat for two reasons. 1) a toe nail is nearly impenetrable to creams and other topical medications, and 2) toe nails grow very slowly.

When do you actually WANT nail fungus?

Fungal Nail infectionMany people come to our office with nails that are yellow and thickened and look “fungal”. The first thing we do is take a nail clipping and send it to the lab. When we find fungus, we have something to treat, and we treat it . When we do not find fungus, we are somewhat “stuck”.

There are some products that can improve the appearance of these “fungal looking” nails that don’t have any fungus. For example, there are whitening agents to get rid of the yellow color, and urea products which decrease nail thickness. But these treatments are only cosmetic. On the other hand, when we do find fungus, then there is a chance for a “cure”.

Toe nail fungus "cure"

The most effective way to treat toe nail fungus is with antifungal medications. And the most effective medication is terbinafine Lamisil). But every patient seems to have heard from somewhere that Lamisil “kills your liver”. This is simply not true. There is a tremendous amount of data and experience with Lamisil to support its safety, or we simply would not use it. The biggest problem we have with Lamisil is cost (it is about $10 per medication) and getting it covered by insurance (many companies will not pay for it).

A different approach

Lamisil is typically prescribed as a long course of continuous therapy: one medication a day for two months to treat finger nails; three months for toe nails. We treat nail fungus with a different approach called “pulse therapy”. Pulse therapy means that you take a one week “pulse” of the medicine every month or every two months. In other words you take Lamisil for seven days in a row (= one pulse) and then nothing for the rest of the month. There is data to support that pulse therapy is just as effective as “continuous therapy”, if not more so. The obvious appeal is that one can achieve the same results with less medicine. This means less potential for side effects and lower cost.

Beyond medications

For those who can not or will not take medications, there are alternatives, but they are less effective. The treatment depends on what the nail looks like, but often consists of two parts. Part one, a topical anti-fungal agent. And part two, an agent to thin out the nail, making it appear more normal and allowing the anti-fungal medicine to penetrate better. We usually prescribe a compound so that both agents are applied as one medicine.

FACTS

  • Even with medications, only about 80% of patients can expect a “cure”
  • When treatment is successful, it still takes 6 to 12 months for a toe nail to grow out completely and look normal again.
  • The nail on the large toe grows at rate of approximately 1mm per month.
Treatment of Adults with Acne

Grown Women With Acne?

Todd Minars, M.D.
Dermatology

Not a day passes in my office when I don’t hear a “thirty-something” woman distressingly ask, “Why am I having acne at this age?  I am not a teenager.”  It is a misconception that acne only affects women during their teens.  Fortunately, there are many options for treatment, but they all fall into one of four categories:  1) creams,  2) pills, 3) peels and 4) laser. “Cream” really includes everything that you put on your skin:  make-up and moisturizers must be oil-free or say “non-comedogenic” on the packaging.  Washes should contain benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid or glycolic acid.  But the most important creams for acne are the retinoids:  Retin-A,  Differin, or Tazorac. Retinoids are the only creams that address the cause of acne:  sticky skin cells in the opening of the hair follicles that don’t shed correctly. 

Pills for acne start with antibiotics and end with Accutane.  But in women there are other choices, including birth control pills and a “hormone-blocking” pill called Aldactone.
         
There is even a prescription vitamin for acne. Other treatments, available at your dermatologist’s office, are peels and lasers.  There are two types of Peels.  1) Chemical peels – such as salicylic acid peels; and 2) Physical peels – such as microdermabrasion.  Both have the same goal – exfoliating skin:  especially those sticky skin cells that block the hair follicles and cause your acne. The choice between salicylic acid and microdermabrasion depends on your skin type.  Acne surgery (extractions) and cortisone injections are also available at your dermatologist’s office.  A cortisoneinjection is the only treatment that is going to make that big red “underground” zit go away in 24 hours instead of three weeks.

And finally, the newest treatment for acne is the SmoothBeam Laser that has recently been FDA approved for the treatment of acne.  With this laser, the patient is treated once every two weeks for four treatments.  The laser targets and selectively shrinks the sebaceous (oil) glands, which play a prominent role in the cause of acne.

For more information, call Dr. Todd Minars at 954-987-7512.

Botulinum Toxin for Cosmetic Uses - Todd Minars

Botox: Secrets to Success:

Todd Minars, M.D.
Dermatology

The cosmetic use of Botox has literally revolutionized the treatment of wrinkles.  The results are dramatic, but natural (if done correctly) and the procedure is safe.  Here are a few tips to achieve the best results:

1. Choose the right doctor.  How?  Ask friends for a recommendation. Use a dermatologist who you have already seen for a skin problem (but make sure that you trust and like this person), or check these resources on the web: Allergan’s website www.botoxcosmetic.com and www.aboutskinsurgery.com. One caveat: If you have your Botox done by somebody who is not a physician, you are asking for trouble.

2. Do not fall for “low price” advertising. These ads in the back of magazines that seem too good to be true, are too good to be true.  Botox is expensive to buy, and they will simply use less of it.

3. Once you’ve been treated, keep your follow-up appointment.  This is an opportunity for the doctor to do “touch-ups” that can make all the difference in your final result.

4. Maintain your Botox.  This usually requires three treatments a year. Botox gives an immediate improvement (first week), but after a few months, the effect increases.  This is for two reasons:  First, the muscles that form wrinkles, smooth out with time and the skin “re-drapes”.  Second, the skin, now free from the muscle that was “ironing” in the line, has time to repair itself.

5. Deep lines need combination treatment.  Botox cannot cure every wrinkle, but results can be enhanced by combining Botox with a second minor procedure. For instance, a great way to treat “Crow’s Feet” is to combine Botox with a very light laser peel.

6. Make Botox part of an overall plan for your skin.  Wear sunscreen, start a home skin care regimen, and combine Botox with other appropriate procedures that improve the overall appearance and structure of your skin.

For more information on Botox treatment, call Dr. Todd Minars at 954-987-7512.

Patient Education Resources

Acne Scar Treatments
Treatment of Acne Scar Acne scars are difficult to treat because the defect is usually located deep within the dermis. A treatment method can only be successful if it reaches a depth equal to or greater than the depth of the scar being targeted. Even the best acne treatment methods fail to achieve 100% improvement. There is no such thing as “perfection” in this area of dermatology, but moderate and in some cases excellent improvement can be achieved.  Treatment Options MICRODERMABRASION Microdermabrasion is essentially a superficial skin peel. A machine uses little crystals to sandblast and buff the skin. Skin looks great after a microdermabrasion treatment. It is brighter and feels smoother. Microdermabrasion is an excellent skin treatment for patients with certain types of acne or pigmentation, but it is too superficial to make a real difference in your acne scars. PUNCH EXCISION A punch excision is simply cutting out a scar and suturing the skin back t...
Acne Treatment Options
ACNE (Laser Treatment) Tired of acne that doesn’t seem to go away? Both doctors have a special expertise in treating difficult acne. Where others have failed, they succeed. The reasons: more options, more experience, and better care. Quickly move up the treatment ladder to more aggressive therapies if results are not apparent Laser Treatment for Acne (Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) and Blue Light) Other (non-laser) Office Procedures for Acne: ACNE OPTIONS Acne Vulgaris – pimples and “zits” – almost everyone has experienced this skin disease in one form or another. The exact cause of acne is complex and only partially understood. But one could oversimplify and say that acne is caused by sticky skin cells in the opening of the hair follicles. The material produced by sebaceous glands is part of the reason that the cells are sticky. The cells form “plugs” in the opening of the hair follicle, and this is called a comedone (a &ldquo...
Fraxel® (Fractional) Laser
The "OLD WAY" Up until now, the gold standard in reversing the signs of aging has been resurfacing with the traditional CO2 laser. Resurfacing is achieved by peeling away a layer of skin while causing tissue contraction. Although this technique achieves dramatic results, patients often undergo general anesthesia and prolonged healing and recovery times (as long as two weeks). The "NEW WAY" – Fractional Resurfacing   A “fractional” laser is one where the laser-light beam is not solid but rather broken up into a grid of thousands of microscopic beams. Think of poking tiny holes in a black piece of paper and covering a flashlight and you get the rough idea.  Unlike old resurfacing lasers that remove the entire top layer of skin, fractional resurfacing works by creating a grid of pinpoint laser beams that zap tiny spots on the skin. This produces thousands of tiny but deep columns of treatment in your skin, known as microtherma...
IPL Treatment. Photo-facials
The term “photo-facial” can be confusing, because it is often misused. To understand what a photofacial does, you must simply remember the colors red and brown.  But lets back up a minute.  The term “Photofacial” was originally coined by a dermatologist in California named Patrick Bitters.  His version of the “photofacial” uses a type of laser called “intense pulsed light” or IPL to rejuvenate photodamaged skin. Today many people call many different laser treatments “photofacials”.  What they all have in common is that they rejuvenate without peeling the skin. But the term “rejuvenate” itself is ambiguous. If we are going to “RE-juvenate” we first must ask ourselves what happens to our skin as we “DE-juvenate” or in other words, as we age. Most people will immediately think of wrinkles.  But don’t forget the colors red and brown. As we age and spend time in ...
Microdermabrasion at Minars Dermatology" (remove the generic title from display)
You may have heard friends talk about having a "Parisian Peel," "Smart Peel," "Power Peel," "Ultra Peel," or "lunchtime peel"— all are types of Microdermabrasion, another tool dermatologists have in their bags to revitalize and resurface skin. The treatment uses a fine mist of microscopic crystals to gently exfoliate the top layers of skin (epidermis). "Think of a sandblaster followed by a vacuum cleaner and you have the general idea of Microdermabrasion," writes a reporter in Skin and Allergy News. These “lunch hour” peels are often done as a series, and can even out fine wrinkling, uneven pigmentation, and smooth out rough, dry skin or a mild acne problem. It may be used in conjunction with a chemical peel or as part of a total plan to rejuvenate your skin. The Procedure Microdermabrasion is performed in the dermatologist’s office and requires no anesthesia. Using a precision hand piece tha...
Radiesse - Dermal Filler
On December 27, 2006 the FDA approved Radiesse for the treatment of facial folds and wrinkles. We now have three fillers to choose from to correct folds and wrinkles on the lower half of the face. We still use Botox to correct lines and wrinkles on the upper half of the face (see Botox vs. Restylane for an explanation). What is Radiesse? Radiesse is an injectable for facial folds and wrinkles. Radiesse is actually a two-part material. It is made of 1 - very small, smooth calcium hydroxylapitite (CaHA) microspheres, which are suspended in 2 - a water-based gel carrier. As Radiesse is injected, the gel and microspheres form a "scaffold", stimulating collagen production and encouraging tissue growth in and around the injection area. Your wrinkles and folds are corrected by this two-part material, plus a third material...your bodies own collagen. The microspheres and the gel immediately act as a filler. Over two to three months the gel is absorbed leaving only ...
Treatments for Male Pattern Baldness
How do I treat male pattern baldness? Propecia I treat patients with Propecia (I have also been treating myself with Propecia for the last seven years. And my brother. And my father….)  DISCLAIMER: Propecia is made by Merck.  I have no relationship with this company or with this product, financial or otherwise.  What is Propecia? Propecia (or the generic name “finasteride”) is a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor.  In other words, it blocks the conversion of testosterone to DHT (dihydrotestosterone).  If you do not have dihydrotestosterone (DHT), you do not go bald.  Why do some men lose their hair?  Hair Loss in Men Men who lose their hair do so because they are genetically programmed to lose their hair. Somewhere in their genes it says something like “at age 25 you will start to lose your hair” and DHT carries out the order.  If there is no DHT then you do not go bald.  An extreme exampl...

Education & Training

  • Medical Degree: NYU School of Medicine
  • Medical Internship: New York Medical College
  • Dermatology Residency: Albert Einstein College of Medicine