Patient Education

Biologics for Rheumatoid Arthritis

"Biologic" medications are a relatively new class of drugs used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Biologics differ from standard medications in that they are derived from proteins created by living cells. (Conventional drugs are chemicals synthesized in a laboratory.) Biologics must be given either by injection or by intravenous infusion (IV). Talk to your rheumatologist to determine whether you are a candidate for biologic treatment. More...

Gout

Gout describes a painful joint condition that results from uric acid crystals forming in the joints, leading to swelling, redness, pain and stiffness. Talk to a rheumatologist about lifestyle changes and medications that help to reduce the number and severity of gout episodes. More...

Lupus - Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

Lupus is an autoimmune diseases that leads to inflammation and damage of parts of the body. Symptoms of lupus vary widely, but the most common symptoms include extreme fatigue, painful or swollen joints (arthritis), unexplained fever, skin rashes, and kidney problems. Symptoms of lupus often come and go in cycles called flares and remissions. At present, there is no cure for lupus. However, lupus can often be effectively controlled with medications and most people with the disease can lead active, healthy lives. Talk to a rheumatologist about treatment options for lupus. More...

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a bone disease that increases the risk of developing fractures (broken bones). It is defined as a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) and bone strength. Osteoporosis is the major cause of fractures in postmenopausal women and the elderly. Osteoporosis can progress slowly without any symptoms until a bone breaks or one or more vertebrae (bones in the spine) collapse. Osteoporosis is largely preventable and people who already have osteoporosis can take a medication to slow its progression and reduce their risk of developing fractures. Ask your rheumatologist if you are a candidate for an osteoporosis medication. More...

Treatment of Fibromyalgia

There is presently no cure for fibromyalgia, but there are several treatments available that can help to reduce the pain, fatigue and other symptoms, and support a more active life. Treatment options include stretching, gentle activity, and a healthy sleep regimen. In some cases, a medication may be prescribed to help get symptoms under control. More...

What is a Rheumatologist?

A rheumatologist is a medical doctor who has completed medical school and additional residency training in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the joints, muscles, and bones. There are more than 100 types of rheumatological conditions that are diagnosed and treated by a rheumatologist, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, gout, and lupus. More...