There are several forms of psoriasis. Some of these include:

  • Plaque psoriasis. Skin lesions are red at the base and covered by silvery scales. This is the most common type of psoriasis
  • Guttate psoriasis. Small, drop-shaped lesions appear on the trunk, limbs, and scalp. Guttate psoriasis is most often triggered by upper respiratory infections (for example, a sore throat caused by streptococcal bacteria).
  • Pustular psoriasis. Blisters of noninfectious pus appear on the skin. Attacks of pustular psoriasis may be triggered by medications, infections, stress, or exposure to certain chemicals.
  • Inverse psoriasis. Smooth, red patches occur in the folds of the skin near the genitals, under the breasts, or in the armpits. The symptoms may be worsened by friction and sweating.
  • Erythrodermic psoriasis. Widespread reddening and scaling of the skin may be a reaction to severe sunburn or to taking corticosteroids (cortisone) or other medications. It can also be caused by a prolonged period of increased activity of psoriasis that is poorly controlled. Erythrodermic psoriasis can be very serious and requires immediate medical attention.

Most people have just one type of psoriasis at a time, but it is possible to have two types simultaneously. And a person with one type of psoriasis (typically plaque psoriasis) may later develop a different type.

Another condition in which people may experience psoriasis is psoriatic arthritis. This is a form of arthritis that produces the joint inflammation common in arthritis and the lesions common in psoriasis. The joint inflammation and the skin lesions don’t necessarily have to occur at the same time.

Psoriasis can occur anywhere on the body. However, individuals with psoriasis will often notice that a particular areas of their body are more prone to developing lesions than other areas.

Some parts of the body are particularly challenging to treat, including the scalp, face, hands, feet, and nails.


Reference: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)

Last updated January 7, 2017

This information is for general educational uses only. It may not apply to you and your personal medical needs. This information should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation with or the advice of your physician or health care professional.

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