Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography, uses high-frequency sound waves to obtain images inside the body. 

Neurosonography (ultrasound of the brain and spinal column) analyzes blood flow in the brain and can diagnose stroke, brain tumors, hydrocephalus (build-up of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain), and vascular problems.  It can also identify or rule out inflammatory processes causing pain.  It is more effective than an X-ray in displaying soft tissue masses and can show tears in ligaments, muscles, tendons, and other soft tissue masses in the back. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is used to view arteries and blood vessels in the neck and determine blood flow and risk of stroke.

During ultrasound, the patient lies on an imaging table and removes clothing around the area of the body to be scanned.  A jelly-like lubricant is applied and a transducer, which both sends and receives high-frequency sound waves, is passed over the body.  The sound wave echoes are recorded and displayed as a computer-generated real-time visual image of the structure or tissue being examined.

Ultrasound is painless, noninvasive, and risk-free.  The test is performed on an outpatient basis and takes between 15 and 30 minutes to complete.


Reference: The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Last updated May 1, 2017

Related Topics

This information is for general educational uses only. It may not apply to you and your personal medical needs. This information should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation with or the advice of your physician or health care professional.

Communicate promptly with your physician or other health care professional with any health-related questions or concerns.

Be sure to follow specific instructions given to you by your physician or health care professional.

error: Content is protected !!